Original Copy
soundmoney:

whitehouse:

No
one
should
lose
their
job
because
of
who
they

love.

unlesstheylovesomeoneinPakistanorAfghanistanorYementhentheycanlosetheirlives.

soundmoney:

whitehouse:

No

one

should

lose

their

job

because

of

who

they

love.

unless

they

love

someone

in

Pakistan

or

Afghanistan

or

Yemen

then

they

can

lose

their

lives.

anarcho-americana:

simonwang:

WHAT IS THIS COMPANY

I’ve always thought their business model was genius. 

mybellarina:

will this ever stop being funny?

mybellarina:

will this ever stop being funny?

sugashane:

The TSA gets shot at and everyone thinks they need guns. Citizens get shot at and everyone thinks they don’t need guns. 

rtamerica:

Closed Senate committee passes bill that cements bulk NSA record collection
In a closed session, the US Senate Intelligence Committee approved legislation that codifies into law the NSA’s bulk collection of domestic telephone metadata.
The bill, sponsored by committee chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), cements bulk phone metadata collection into the business records provision (Section 215) of the Patriot Act, strengthening NSA surveillance legality allowed under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). 
“The NSA call-records program is legal and subject to extensive congressional and judicial oversight,”Feinstein said in a statement. “I believe it contributes to our national security. But more can and should be done to increase transparency and build public support for privacy protections in place.”

rtamerica:

Closed Senate committee passes bill that cements bulk NSA record collection

In a closed session, the US Senate Intelligence Committee approved legislation that codifies into law the NSA’s bulk collection of domestic telephone metadata.

The bill, sponsored by committee chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), cements bulk phone metadata collection into the business records provision (Section 215) of the Patriot Act, strengthening NSA surveillance legality allowed under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). 

“The NSA call-records program is legal and subject to extensive congressional and judicial oversight,”Feinstein said in a statement. “I believe it contributes to our national security. But more can and should be done to increase transparency and build public support for privacy protections in place.”

Only the United States and Israel opposed the resolution, down from three states last year in an annual vote over the crippling blockade by a giant super power against its tiny Caribbean neighbor. It was the 22nd year in a row that the UN voted in favor of the unenforceable resolution. China, Iran, Latin American and African nations all publicly condemned the United States. “The US policy against Cuba is suffering from an absolute international isolation and discredit and lacks every ethical or legal ground,” Cuba’s Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez Parrilla said. While the United States has eased travel restrictions on Cubans, Parrilla said: “Sanctions remain intact and are being fully implemented.” Cuba has lost more than $1.1 trillion dollars because of the embargo, according to the minister who told the meeting how the blockade prevents Cuba from getting heart and anti-AIDS drugs for children.
Details:

The family of a 67-year-old midwife from a remote village in North Waziristan told lawmakers on Tuesday about her death and the “CIA drone” they say was responsible. Their harrowing accounts marked the first time Congress had ever heard from civilian victims of an alleged US drone strike.
Rafiq ur Rehman, a Pakistani primary school teacher who appeared on Capitol Hill with his children, Zubair, 13, and Nabila, 9, described his mother, Momina Bibi, as the “string that held our family together”. His two children, who were gathering okra with their grandmother the day she was killed, on 24 October 2012, were injured in the attack.
"Nobody has ever told me why my mother was targeted that day," Rehman said, through a translator. "Some media outlets reported that the attack was on a car, but there is no road alongside my mother’s house. Others reported that the attack was on a house. But the missiles hit a nearby field, not a house. All of them reported that three, four, five militants were killed.”
Instead, he said, only one person was killed that day: “Not a militant but my mother.” […]
Nabila [told] lawmakers that she had been gathering okra with her brother and grandmother when she saw a drone and “I heard the dum dum noise.”
"Everything was dark and I couldn’t see anything. I heard a scream. I think it was my grandmother but I couldn’t see her.
"All I could think of was running."
Rehman told lawmakers that he is seeking answers to why his mother was targeted. The strike has affected his wider family, who no longer visit because they fear the drones might kill them too. […]
Rehman said: “In the end I would just like to ask the American public to treat us as equals. Make sure that your government gives us the same status of a human with basic rights as they do to their own citizens. We do not kill our cattle the way US is killing humans in Waziristan with drones. This indiscriminate killing has to end and justice must be delivered to those who have suffered at the hands of unjust.” […]
The hearing was attended by only five members of Congress, and Grayson said such low numbers of lawmakers at hearings were not unusual. 

Details:

The family of a 67-year-old midwife from a remote village in North Waziristan told lawmakers on Tuesday about her death and the “CIA drone” they say was responsible. Their harrowing accounts marked the first time Congress had ever heard from civilian victims of an alleged US drone strike.

Rafiq ur Rehman, a Pakistani primary school teacher who appeared on Capitol Hill with his children, Zubair, 13, and Nabila, 9, described his mother, Momina Bibi, as the “string that held our family together”. His two children, who were gathering okra with their grandmother the day she was killed, on 24 October 2012, were injured in the attack.

"Nobody has ever told me why my mother was targeted that day," Rehman said, through a translator. "Some media outlets reported that the attack was on a car, but there is no road alongside my mother’s house. Others reported that the attack was on a house. But the missiles hit a nearby field, not a house. All of them reported that three, four, five militants were killed.

Instead, he said, only one person was killed that day: “Not a militant but my mother.” […]

Nabila [told] lawmakers that she had been gathering okra with her brother and grandmother when she saw a drone and “I heard the dum dum noise.”

"Everything was dark and I couldn’t see anything. I heard a scream. I think it was my grandmother but I couldn’t see her.

"All I could think of was running."

Rehman told lawmakers that he is seeking answers to why his mother was targeted. The strike has affected his wider family, who no longer visit because they fear the drones might kill them too. […]

Rehman said: “In the end I would just like to ask the American public to treat us as equals. Make sure that your government gives us the same status of a human with basic rights as they do to their own citizens. We do not kill our cattle the way US is killing humans in Waziristan with drones. This indiscriminate killing has to end and justice must be delivered to those who have suffered at the hands of unjust.” […]

The hearing was attended by only five members of Congress, and Grayson said such low numbers of lawmakers at hearings were not unusual. 

proudblackconservative:

I was homeschooled. Where my people at?

laliberty:

Because, of course.